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by mtarsi

The range of cognitive development that occurs in patients with mitochondrial disease is as broad as possible, and demonstrates how difficult it is to prognosticate about a patient's long-term outcome. Some patients exhibit delays from birth and have evidence of prenatal onset disease, demonstrating seizures at birth or congenital hypotonia. Others may display no apparent cognitive issues for decades, if at all.

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

The central nervous system is perhaps the most at risk organ system in mitochondrial disease because of its high dependency on energy.  The potential symptoms affecting the brain are myriad and affect all aspects of function.  Onset can occur prenatally or not for several decades, if at all. 

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

The gastrointestinal tract is an important and often overlooked site of mitochondrial disease symptoms.  Gastrointestinal abnormalities may be an early presenting sign of mitochondrial disease (Chitkara, 2003).  In general, patients with GI symptoms do not get referred for a metabolic or mitochondrial evaluation unless neurological symptoms are also present.  Mitochondrial disease should be part of the differential diagnosis for individuals with dysmotility, chronic diarrhea, constipation or chronic abdominal pain (Chitkara, 2003).

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

A. GI/Nutrition

i. Overview

ii. Anorexia and poor feeding

iii. Vomiting

iv. Abdominal pain

v. Constipation and diarrhea

B. Neuromuscular

Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi
PROTOCOL - General surgery and procedures requiring sedation or anesthesia PROTOCOL - General surgery and procedures requiring sedation or anesthesia when eating or the gut is disrupted
Jul 03, 2008 Comments: 0
by mtarsi

Brealey D, Brand M, Hargreaves I, et al.  Association between mitochondrial dysfunction and severity and outcome of septic shock.  Lancet 2002;360(9328):219-23.  Chinnery PF, Turnbull DM.  Mitochondrial medicine.  Quart J Med 1997;90(11):657-67.Ince C.  The microcirculation is the motor of sepsis.  Crit Care 2005;9Suppl4:S13-9. Muravchick S, Levy RJ.  Clinical implications of mitochondrial dysfunction.  Anesthesiol 2006;105(4):819-37. 

Jul 02, 2008 Comments: 0

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